Stefan Grossman's Guitar Workshop Instructional and Historical DVDs Books and Materials
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Martin Taylor

"One of the great virtuosi of his instrument, producing torrents of the hardly possible without spilling any perspiration. However, behind the racing brain and apparently 16 fingers is a mind that loves the evocative beauty in a good melody and can spread it out shimmering, like no-one else." –Guitar International

Grammy nominated Martin Taylor, is a virtuoso guitarist, composer, educator and musical innovator whomAcoustic Guitar magazine calls ‘THE Acoustic Guitarist of his Generation’. Widely considered to be the world’s foremost exponent of solo jazz and fingerstyle guitar playing, Martin possesses an inimitable style that has earned him global acclaim from fellow musicians, fans and critics alike. He dazzles audiences with a signature style that artfully combines his virtuosity, emotion and humor with a strong, engaging stage presence.

Martin has enjoyed a remarkable musical career spanning across five decades, with more than 100 recordings to his credit. Completely self-taught beginning at the early age of 4, he has invented and developed a unique way of playing the guitar that is greatly admired, and often emulated, by guitarists all over the world.

Tablature is available as a PDF file for each lesson. Lessons are filmed with multiple cameras and consist of a performance, explanation, and conclude with a slow tempo split screen that follows the tab/music.

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Martin Taylor Single Song Downloads


Darn That Dream
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Darn That Dream" is a popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Eddie DeLange, published in 1939. The song was introduced in the Broadway musical Swingin' the Dream. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of G.


 


Dolphin
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

Luiz Mainzi da Cunha Eca was a Brazilian jazz samba and bossa nova pianist from Rio de Janeiro, probably best known for his 1960s work with the bossa nova Tamba Trio/ Tamba 4. His composition "The Dolphin" is considered a jazz standard, being recorded by artists as diverse as Stan Getz, Bill Evans and Denny Zeitlin. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of A.


 


Don't Get Around Much Anymore
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Don't Get Around Much Anymore" is a jazz standard with music by Duke Ellington and lyrics by Bob Russell. The tune was originally called "Never No Lament"  and was first recorded by Ellington in 1940 as a big-band instrumental. Russell's lyrics and the new title were added in 1942. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of D. 

 


Drop Me Off In Harlem
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Drop Me Off in Harlem" is a 1933 song composed by Duke Ellington, with lyrics written by Nick Kenny. A.H. Lawrence writes that the song originated from an off the cuff remark from Ellington. Nick Kenny had hailed a taxi, and offered to share it with Ellington. Kenny asked "Where to, Duke?," and Ellington replied "Drop me off at Harlem." Kenny then fashioned lyrics from Ellington's remark and presented him with them a few days later at the Cotton Club. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of C.

 


Georgia On My Mind
Level: 3
Tuning: Standard

"Georgia On My Mind" was written in 1930 by Hoagy Carmichael (music) and Stuart Gorrell (lyrics). It was first recorded on September 15, 1930, in New York by Hoagy Carmichael and His Orchestra with Bix Beiderbecke on muted cornet and Hoagy Carmichael on vocals. It featured Eddie Lang on guitar. The recording was part of Beiderbecke's last recording session. There are many fingerstyle arrangements of this tune but Martin's is perhaps the tour de force of all. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of E.


 


Here's That Rainy Day
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Here's That Rainy Day" is a popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Johnny Burke, published in 1953. It was introduced by Dolores Gray in the Broadway musical Carnival in Flanders. The song has been recorded by many jazz and pop singers. It is also a favorite of jazz instrumentalists, with renditions by Joe Pass, Gene Ammons, Chet Baker, Ray Brown, Dave Brubeck, Paul Desmond, Bill Evans, Art Farmer,Freddie Hubbard, Wes Montgomery, Art Pepper, Oscar Peterson, Toots Thielemans, Urbie Green, Alvin "Red" Tyler, L.A. Jazz Quintet and McCoy Tyner, among many others. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of G.

 


I Got Rhythm
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"I Got Rhythm" was composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin and published in 1930. It became a jazz standard. Its chord progression, known as the "rhythm changes" is the foundation for many other popular jazz tunes such as Charlie Parker's and Dizzy Gillespie's bebop standard "Anthropology (Thrivin' on a Riff)." Martin's arrangement is played in the key of G.


 


I Thought About You
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"I Thought About You" is a 1939 popular song composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. It was one of three collaborations Van Heusen and Mercer wrote for the then recently established Mercer-Morris publishing company. The lyrics were inspired by Mercer's train trip to Chicago. Mercer has said about the song: "I can remember the afternoon that we wrote it. He (Van Heusen) played me the melody. I didn't have any idea, but I had to go to Chicago that night. I think I was on the Benny Goodman program. And I got to thinking about it on the train. I was awake, I couldn't sleep. The tune was running through my mind, and that's when I wrote the song. On the train, really going to Chicago." Martin's arrangement is played in the key of C.

 


I'm Beginning to See the Light
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"I'm Beginning to See the Light" is a popular song and jazz standard, written by Duke Ellington, Don George, Johnny Hodges, and Harry James, and published in 1944. Ella Fitzgerald and The Ink Spots recorded a version in 1945, that was on the pop song hits list for six weeks. In 1945. Duke Ellington also released in 1945 a version, which reached the top ten. Ellington's inspiration for this song was his recent initiation into Freemasonry. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of C.


 


In A Mellow Tone
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"In a Mellow Tone," also known as In a "Mellotone," is a 1939 jazz standard composed by Duke Ellington, with lyrics written by Milt Gabler. The song was based on the 1917 standard "Rose Room" by Art Hickman and Harry Williams. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of Ab.

 


Just Squeeze Me
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Just Squeeze Me (But Please Don't Tease Me)" is a 1941 popular song composed by Duke Ellington. It was original an instrumental titled "Subtle Slough." Lee Gaines added lyrics and the tune was retitled. The song has been recorded numerous times by a number of artists in the years since, having become a jazz standard. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of D.

 


Like Someone In Love
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Like Someone in Love" is a popular song composed in 1944 by Jimmy Van Heusen, with lyrics by Johnny Burke. It was written (along with "Sleighride in July") for the 1944 film Belle of the Yukon, where it was sung by Dinah Shore. It was a hit for Bing Crosby in March 1945, reaching #15, and has since become a jazz standard. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of A. 

 


Old Man River
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Old Man River" was written by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was a featured song in the 1927 musical Show Boat that contrasts the struggles and hardships of African Americans with the endless, uncaring flow of the Mississippi River. The song is notable for its lyrical pentatonic scale melody. Martin takes this haunting melody and adapts it to his unique fingerstyle jazz approach.

Martin's arrangement is played in the key of C.

 Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra had a hit recording of the song in 1928 sung in a much faster tempo than Kern and Hammerstein intended, and featuring Bing Crosby on vocals and Bix Beiderbecke on cornet. A second version, by Paul Whiteman with bass singer Paul Robeson on vocals and sung in a dance tempo, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2006. 
 

 


Polka Dots and Moonbeams
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Polka Dots and Moonbeams" is a popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Johnny Burke, published in 1940. It was Frank Sinatra's first hit recorded with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. The song is one of the top 100 most-frequently recorded jazz standards with arrangements by Gil Evans and others and notable recordings by Blue Mitchell, Wes Montgomery, Lester Young, and many others. During the song's first year, a fashion designer even created a "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" fabric print as part of a series of prints inspired by popular music. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of D.


 


Second Time Around
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"The Second Time Around" is a song with words by Sammy Cahn and music by Jimmy Van Heusen. It was introduced in the 1960 film High Time, sung by Bing Crosby with Henry Mancini conducting his orchestra, and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of A. 

 


Take Five
Level: 4
Tuning: Standard

"Take Five" is a jazz piece composed by Paul Desmond and performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet on their 1959 album Time Out. Two years after the album was released it became an unlikely hit and the biggest-selling jazz single ever. Written in the key of E-flat minor, it is known for its distinctive two-chord piano vamp; catchy blues-scale saxophone melody; inventive, jolting drum solo and use of the unusual quintuple (5/4) time, from which its name is derived. Chet Atkins recorded a popular fingerstyle version but Martin takes the composition to new heights. Martin's arrangement is played in the key of G.