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Jim Ohlschmidt

I grew up in the city of Sheboygan, Wis. and in the late 1960s I began playing the guitar. Like many young folks, I was swept up in the popular music of the time, which included not only rock from both sides of the Atlantic, but also folk music, and perhaps the most seminal of influences - blues. 

In the early 1970s I heard three guitarists who have been (and continue to be) an enormous influence on me and my particular music direction. They are John Fahey, Mississippi John Hurt, and Merle Travis. John Fahey was the first fingerpicking guitarist I listened to intently to learn the basics of this wonderfully eclectic and adaptable style of playing. Fahey played mostly original instrumental compositions that borrowed heavily from pre-war country blues and blending in other sounds and influences to make bold, visionary artistic statements. He also played in open tunings on acoustic guitar, giving the instrument a rich sonority and different tonal possibilities. The music of John Fahey opened a world of music to me that I am still exploring and using in my work today. 

When I first heard Mississippi John Hurt’s “Last Sessions” LP, I was mesmerized by his beautiful fingerpicking sound. Unlike Fahey, who played with a forceful, deliberate attack on the strings, John Hurt’s picking sounded to me like a river, the notes flowing in a soulful, rhythmic stream coming from somewhere ancient. His voice and his songs convey a calm wisdom, although at the time I had no idea where John had come from (other than Mississippi) or what his life had been like. I knew that John’s playing was beautiful and fundamental, and I went about trying to unravel his picking to learn how to play like him. 

It wasn’t until 2004 that I began recording John Hurt’s songs after I visited Hurt’s hometown of Avalon, Mississippi, on the Eastern edge of the Delta. So much has changed in Mississippi since John lived there (1892-1966), but the landscape around Avalon and Carrollton remains mostly the same. I made many trips to the area in the following years, and got to know pretty well some of the folks who lived on the same old dirt roads John Hurt walked on. I ended up recording four CDs of John’s songs, and I’m even mentioned in a recent Hurt biography. I play a few of John’s tunes every time I perform, and everywhere I go people enjoy his music.  – Jim Ohlschmidt

 

 

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Jim Ohlschmidt Single Song Downloads


Barbara Allen
Level: 2
Tuning: Dropped D

From his original 1946 "folk song" sessions, Merle's arrangement of this classic tune is a rare instance where he used an alternate tuning. The brief instrumental breaks in his accompaniment sound simple enough, but there are a few intricacies to challenge the intermediate player.



Black Gold
Level: 1
Tuning: Standard

When Merle wrote the songs that appeared on his 1963 LP "Songs Of The Coal Mines" he set out to paint a vivid picture of the Western Kentucky coal-mining culture he had grown up with. His spoken introduction in the original recording talks of men whose faces and bodies have been made old before their time by their difficult and harrowing work deep under the ground. Using mostly simple chords, this tune is a great intro to Merle's coal mining songs.



Dark As A Dungeon
Level: 1
Tuning: Standard

One of Merle's best-known songs, the poetic imagery and beautiful melody makes it a true Americana classic. With a simple accompaniment using some of Travis' common chord positions, the instrumental breaks are a kind of lovely "echo" of the chorus. Many artists have performed this song over the years, and now you can, too.



I Am A Pilgrim
Level: 2
Tuning: Standard

Another famous arrangement of an old hymn by Merle, his original recording in 1946 has inspired many guitarists to learn play "thumbstyle," as they call it in Western Kentucky. This tune uses some of Travis' oft-played bluesy licks in the key of E.



Jordan Am A Hard Road To Travel
Level: 2/3
Tuning: Standard

On old banjo tune originally recorded by Uncle Dave Macon and the McGee Brothers in the 1920s, Merle's arrangement in the key of C offers plenty of challenges in the longer instrumental breaks, and some of the licks he used here were heard again later in some of his other tunes, notably "Saturday Night Shuffle."



Nobody's Dirty Business
Level: 2
Tuning: Standard

A tune that became popular around the time John Hurt made his first recordings is relatively easy to play, with simple chords and subtle variations, all in first position. Another good tune to start learning John's picking in C.



That's All
Level: 3
Tuning: Standard

Another Merle Travis original based on an old sermon, his accompaniment presents several challenges, not the least of which is the moving bass line he frets with his left hand thumb in the verses. Lots of nice, bluesy licks to dig deep into the key of E.



The Midnight Special
Level: 2/3
Tuning: Standard

Merle's take on the Lead Belly classic uses many of the licks and chordal devices he used frequently in the key of E. His performance of this tune on the Porter Wagoner Show is a fantastic rendition, and is the basis of the transcription presented here.



This World Is Not My Home
Level: 1/2
Tuning: Standard

One of the tracks from the 1946 session that didn't see daylight until its release on a compilation in the 1990s, Merle's version of this very old hymn is simple, with a nice, gentle swing and some nice bass lines between chords. Yet another example of how Merle Travis made church music sound like the blues!