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Aunt Molly's Murray Farm- The Gramercy Park Sheik

 
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  • Aunt Molly's Murray Farm- The Gramercy Park Sheik
    Hard Copy    $15.00  Item Number:  sggw118

    Artist: Stefan Grossman Publisher: SGGW CD Collection


    Product Details

    Description

    This  CD brings together the first two solo albums I recorded. Aunt Molly’s Murray Farm was released in 1969. The Gramercy Park Sheik came out in 1970.

    For this CD release we have combined both albums. We have added tab/music transcriptions for 15 arrangements. There’s lots of memories and history for me on the tracks of this CD. I hope you enjoy the sounds.

    Track Listing: (click on tracks for mp3 sound samples)

    AUNT MOLLY'S MURRAY FARM
    1. Aunt Molly's Murray Farm
    2. Foregone Conclusion
    3. Religious Trainfare Blues *
    4. See See Rider *
    5. Delia *
    6. Sideways Nowhere Bound
    7. Special Rider *
    8. Wall Hollow Blues
    9. Cow Cow's 4/4 Waltz
    10. Dallas Rag *
    11. All My Friends Are Gone *
    12. Number One
    13. Boys, My Money's All Gone *
    14. Big Road Blues
    15. Roberta *

    THE GRAMERCY PARK SHEIK
    16. Little Rock Blues No. 2 *
    17. Lena Anne *
    18. Hans Fried
    19. Crow Black Squall
    20. Gentle Joys, Gentle Sorrows *
    21. Requiem For Patrick Kilroy *
    22. Yola Blues
    23. Not You Or I, My Dear *
    24. Mississippi Blues No. 2 *
    25. Cross Eyed Blues *
    26. Irene's Sleepy Lullaby

    Those tunes marked with a star ( * ) are included in the tab/music PDF booklet on this CD.

    You will need Adobe Acrobat (a free download) to open and print this file from your computer.

    Review: It's a well-known irony that if you were interested in playing traditional blues in the sixties, one of the best places you could be was overseas in England. Fed up with the Vietnam War, Stefan Grossman headed across the pond and began running around the town with the likes of Cream going to see new blues bands like Pink Floyd. Grossman got his traditional licks honestly from none other than his teacher the "Rev" (Reverend Gary Davis), and no doubt picked up some influence from earnest fingerpickers like Davey Graham while he was at it.

    This CD reissue compiles Stefan Grossman's first two solo acoustic records (an earlier release was a band effort). "Aunt Molly's Murray Farm" was recorded in 1968 and "The Gramercy Park Shiek" followed a year later. Both show the enthusiasm and pluck of a guy who has found his vocation and wants to share it with the world, yet doesn't quite have the ideas or chops to match his dreams.

    "Aunt Molly's Murray Farm" is filled with competent blues and rags that show a distinct Davis influence, whether they be done with a bottleneck or fingerpicked. All are admirable representations of the genre without being too spectacular; the tunes are fairly straightforward blues (albeit skillfully played) with pedestrian lyrics. It's apparent that Grossman is on to something, but hasn't quite figured out how to make it his own. Still, there's enough good music here to make this an album of interest, especially coupled with the next record he made.

    For "The Gramercy Park Sheik" Grossman picked up a better guitar and better songs. All of a sudden Grossman shows up some influence from the traditional tunes of the island and, when couple with the folk leanings of his previous records, he starts to create some beautifully realized originals. The two songs in the middle, "Gentle Joys, Gentle Sorrows" and "Requiem For Patrick Kilroy" are filled with interesting little licks and novel melodies. Even "Crossed Eyed Blues" shows a little variation on the blues format, along with some better lyric writing.

    It was clear at this point that Grossman was going to be a significant player on the acoustic guitar front, and that his best days were ahead of him. While not the best Grossman has to offer on record, these early efforts show an eagerness and ragged charm that makes many artists' first recordings a fun endeavor. – David Rickert


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